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Green Scene

  • Five ways to lower risk for breast cancer

    By SAMANTHA KENNEDY
    Wakulla Extension Service

  • In the garden now: Peanuts

    By LES HARRISON
    and
    SAMANTHA KENNEDY
    Of Wakulla Extension

    In Wakulla County, as it is in all of North Florida, October is a transition month for home gardeners with the summer vegetables ebbing in both growth and production.
    Fall and winter crops are going in, but in most cases, they are still too underdeveloped to utilize in any volume.
    It is a curious alignment of convenience that one of the last to harvest garden crops fits neatly into use during the autumn season’s sporting events.

  • Preventing Type 2 diabetes

    By SAMANTHA KENNEDY
    Wakulla Extension Service

  • In the garden now Nov. 9, 2017: Radishes

    By LES HARRISON
    and
    SAMANTHA KENNEDY
    Of Wakulla Extension

    One common complaint about vegetable gardening is it takes so long for the end product to be ready for harvest. In most cases the average is 90 days, but some can extend out to 180 or more days.
    Another is the seasonal limitations of plants. The range of acceptable temperatures is relatively narrow for most, but there is one notable exception in Wakulla County.

  • In the garden now: Peppers

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    Autumn is here, but activities are hot as ever in Wakulla County’s home gardens. While many summer crops are winding up, one is still producing consistently.
    Sweet and hot peppers are the warm-season favorite still delivering a generous bounty. The popularity is possibly traced to the variety of cultivars within this genus which are available for every taste and culinary tradition.

  • In the garden now:Butter Beans

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    There was a time in Wakulla County before air conditioning became commonly available, that families spent much of their summers outside. Children played in the yards and woods, and the adults enjoyed the shade and comfort of the porch.

  • Pack a healthy school lunch

    By SAMANTHA KENNEDY
    Wakulla Extension Service

  • In the garden now:Okra, A favorite of Southern cooks, okra thrives in heat

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    The heat and humidity have taken its toll on most garden plants in Wakulla County. Whatever was left was attacked by a bumper crop of caterpillars and grasshoppers.
    There is one heat hardy, insect resistant vegetable plant which is continuing to bloom and produce. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) plants are still delivering the tasty pods which are the basis for numerous Southern side orders and gumbos.

  • Enjoy the sun safely this year

    By SAMANTHA KENNEDY
    Wakulla Extension Service

  • In the Garden Now: Corn is thriving with all the recent rain

    One thing is certain, the recent rains are making the grass and most other plants grow. Thankfully the conversations about drought have been silenced for the time being and everything is green.
    In the local home gardens a member of the grass family is responding positively to all the moisture from above. Sweet corn in many gardens is now nearing peak ripeness and ready for any of the many preparation options for human consumption.