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Green Scene

  • Broccoli is a hardy winter plant, and an excellent source of vitamin C

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    The spring garden seed catalogs are arriving daily in the mail with plentiful photos of spring flowers, and vegetables in the back of the publication.
    Wakulla County’s gardeners have to make good use of their limited home garden space, which sometimes eliminates health choices in favor of colorful options.

  • In the garden now: Onions

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office

    The recent arrival earlier of frigid winter weather in Wakulla County by way of 2017’s first polar express has changed the gardening landscape.
    Only the hardiest vegetables have survived, and most of these are leaf crops.
    One resilient vegetable which is not strictly a leaf crop planted in the autumn for winter harvest is the onion.
    If raised for the bulb, the onion is approximately a 180 day crop which is harvested in the late spring.

  • 6 simple ways to greener living

    Special to The News

    Protecting the planet is a goal for millions of people across the globe. And that’s a good thing, as the planet is increasingly in need of help.
    Behaviors few people may give a second thought to can dramatically impact the planet in a negative way. For example, according to Worldwatch Institute, 100 billion plastic bags are thrown away each year, less than 1 percent find their way into recycling bins. The end result of that waste is the deaths of around 1 billion birds and mammals each year due to the ingestion of plastic.

  • Brussel Sprouts

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office

    The beginning of winter is under two weeks away. Overnight temperatures are forecast to nosedive into the subfreezing range in short order which will bring many of Wakulla County’s vegetable gardening efforts to a screeching halt.
    It might seem strange, but there will be successful vegetable gardening ongoing during this chilly weather. One of those cold weather crops is Brussels sprouts, and it will handle the frigid temperature readings with barely a notice.

  • In the Garden Now: Vegetable economics

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office

    Vegetable gardening has many highly desirable benefits. These range from it being a good source of exercise, an opportunity to produce fresh produce which may be hard to find in retail establishments, and being able to assure it is produced in a specific way.

  • Preparing for the next storm

    By SHELLEY SWENSON
    Wakulla Extension Service

     

  • Buying locally grown food

    Over a year ago I made one of the best decisions I have made in some time – I joined a CSA, which means I joined into the movement called Community Supported Agriculture.
    What this means for me is that each week a local farmer delivers a bag of fresh vegetables and fruits, bread and a sweet to my office. I pay for six months at a time upfront and have chosen my favorites from a list of possibilities based on my personal likes and cooking preferences.

  • In the garden now: Squash

    By LES HARRISON and GOHAR UMAR
    of the Extension Office

    An often asked question at the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension office during gardening season is which cultivar is best to plant. The response is usually the nebulous sounding statement of “It depends...”
    Squash are a good example of how this vague pronouncement functions. The grower must select a cultivar based on their needs and preferences, which should be considered before the planting begins.

  • In the garden now: Tomatoes & Peppers

    By LES HARRISON
    and
    GOHAR UMAR
    of the Extension Office

    Two locally popular vegetables are currently being cultivated in the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Master Gardener demonstration garden in Crawfordville for the purpose of comparing the performance of different cultivars.
    Tomatoes and peppers have a long history in Wakulla County home gardens and of being cultivated in the New World prior to Spanish exploration.
    Both belong to the Solanaceae botanical family, but each represents a different genus.

  • Improve savings and health with minor changes in your home

    By SHELLEY SWENSON
    Wakulla Extension Service