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Green Scene

  • Broccoli is a hardy winter plant, and an excellent source of vitamin C

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    The spring garden seed catalogs are arriving daily in the mail with plentiful photos of spring flowers, and vegetables in the back of the publication.
    Wakulla County’s gardeners have to make good use of their limited home garden space, which sometimes eliminates health choices in favor of colorful options.

  • Caution: Poison ivy and poison oak

    The spring-like temperatures and clear blue skies serve as a near irresistible enticement to enjoy Wakulla County’s natural environs. The springs, forest and coastline each have a unique charm and attraction for most.
    With all the anticipation, there has to be a word of caution to check for signs which may indicate a problem. To be sure, be aware there is a sign of three leaves in a cluster which must be considered by all who venture outdoors.

  • Merganser ducks will soon be flying north

    Air travel has its advantages, even today with all the hoops one must jump through to gain access to this mode of 21st Century transportation.
    Given the distances to far flung destinations, it is in many cases the only realistic option.
    Still there are challenges which try the patience of even the most experienced traveler. The screenings, the searches, the carry-on luggage rules and the long lines of sometimes impatient or rude fellow travelers can be trying.

  • Time for soil tests

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    Residents of Wakulla County are heading out of doors to engage in the wide array of available activities. Sunshine, fresh air and there are very few insects to encounter, so far.
    One traditional activity is the spring vegetable garden. While some may consider it a chore, many view it as a means to enhancing their personal health through production of high quality dietary choices.

  • Purple nutsedge is an invasive that squeezes out native grasses

    The return of consistent warm weather to Wakulla County has many residents thinking about the state of their lawns. Mowing, fertilizing, weeding and patching bald spots are now the focus of homeowners and landscape maintenance professionals.
    The choice of turf depends on the preferences and needs of the landscape’s owner. Bahiagrass, Bermudagrass, Centipede, Zoysia, and others are selected for their particular traits and appearance.
    However, there is one exotic “grass” not on any list of popular spring turf or ground covers.

  • In the Garden Now; English peas

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office
    and GOHAR ULMAR
    FAMU Horticulture

    April in Wakulla County is a transitional gardening month. Both spring and winter gardens are being tended, with the winter crops coming to an end soon while the spring crops are developing.
    From a weather perspective, the year 2017 has been rough on vegetable gardening. The winter was unusually warm, there have been late cool spells with frost and the rain is either excessive or nonexistent.

  • In the garden now: Onions

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office

    The recent arrival earlier of frigid winter weather in Wakulla County by way of 2017’s first polar express has changed the gardening landscape.
    Only the hardiest vegetables have survived, and most of these are leaf crops.
    One resilient vegetable which is not strictly a leaf crop planted in the autumn for winter harvest is the onion.
    If raised for the bulb, the onion is approximately a 180 day crop which is harvested in the late spring.

  • 6 simple ways to greener living

    Special to The News

    Protecting the planet is a goal for millions of people across the globe. And that’s a good thing, as the planet is increasingly in need of help.
    Behaviors few people may give a second thought to can dramatically impact the planet in a negative way. For example, according to Worldwatch Institute, 100 billion plastic bags are thrown away each year, less than 1 percent find their way into recycling bins. The end result of that waste is the deaths of around 1 billion birds and mammals each year due to the ingestion of plastic.

  • Brussel Sprouts

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office

    The beginning of winter is under two weeks away. Overnight temperatures are forecast to nosedive into the subfreezing range in short order which will bring many of Wakulla County’s vegetable gardening efforts to a screeching halt.
    It might seem strange, but there will be successful vegetable gardening ongoing during this chilly weather. One of those cold weather crops is Brussels sprouts, and it will handle the frigid temperature readings with barely a notice.

  • In the Garden Now: Vegetable economics

    By LES HARRISON
    of the Extension Office

    Vegetable gardening has many highly desirable benefits. These range from it being a good source of exercise, an opportunity to produce fresh produce which may be hard to find in retail establishments, and being able to assure it is produced in a specific way.