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Government

  • Fireworks before the Fourth

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, July 1 – As the Independence Day holiday approached this week, many of the fireworks surrounding Florida politics were in the courtroom, where a sweeping state law on abortion came under a judge’s harsh scrutiny.

  • A pause to give thanks

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, Nov. 23 – As they gathered a couple of days before Thanksgiving to get organized for next year’s legislative session, many of the lawmakers at the Capitol had more to be grateful for than some extra time off, a pending feast of turkey and trimmings, and some midweek football.

  • Community center may lose grant

    A grant that pays for after school tutoring at the community center is in danger of going away, according to County Administrator David Edwards.
    That grant, the 21st Century grant administered by Tallahassee Community College, is tied to another grant and programs operated at the community center by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. In fact, the loss of the 21st Century grant has the potential to be devastating to the youth coalition and its programs.

  • Can I get a mulligan?

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, June 24 – There might not have been much cursing or broken clubs, but there was one way in which Florida politics this week resembled a golf game: Everyone seemed to want a mulligan.

  • On a warm summer’s week

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, June 10 – Florida might not have been on a train bound for nowhere this week, but there were still times when the state’s government and political news felt a lot like “The Gambler.”
    “You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em,” Kenny Rogers sings in the country music classic. “Know when to fold ‘em. Know when to walk away. And know when to run.”

  • Shall we play a game?

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, June 3 – The game’s the thing, or at least it was this week in Florida politics. A judge grappled with the future of high-stakes card games, while a state panel tried to map out a plan for a controversial sport.
    The judge in question was dealing with how pari-mutuel facilities are running popular card games. The state panel was the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, facing new pressure to allow another round of bear hunting in Florida.

  • Issues of authority

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, May 20 – The issues in Florida were driven by questions of authority this week.
    Did Florida utility regulators act within their authority by allowing Florida Power & Light to invest ratepayers’ money in a controversial Oklahoma natural-gas project? Did the Obama administration overreach with “guidance” dealing with how public schools should treat transgender students? Can an inmate essentially shut down a Death Row appeal being pursued by his attorney?

  • Waiting to inhale

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, May 13 – With all due respect to Kermit the Frog, it’s getting easier to be green in Florida.
    With more than 3,000 people descending on Central Florida for the nation’s premiere cannabis business trade show this week, and a new poll again showing that voters seem poised to approve wide-ranging medical marijuana, it looks increasingly like the state might be going to pot.

  • The north rises again

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, April 22 – Ever since the departure of the Pork Chop Gang – a cadre of North Florida lawmakers who ruled state government through the middle part of the 20th Century – the northern reaches of the state have sometimes seemed like second-tier parts of Florida.

  • The final measures

    By BRANDON LARRABEE
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, April 15 – This is the way the bill-signing season ends. Not with a whimper, but a bang.
    Gov. Rick Scott finished off his duties from the 2016 legislative session by vetoing a bill on one of the most emotional and volatile issues that the House and Senate faced this year – not anything about the state’s schools or its environmental treasures, but a fight over what happens when a marriage falls apart.