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Government

  • Delegation listens to local concerns

    Members of the Wakulla legislative delegation – Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, and Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee – were in Crawfordville on Thursday, Sept. 28, to hear what was on the minds of their local constituents before the start of the legislative session, slated to get underway on Jan. 9.
    Education was at the top of the list, as was concern that the state is not adequately funding Florida Forever and protecting the environment.

  • The aftermath of Irma

    By DARA KAM
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 22 – More than 10 days after Hurricane Irma crashed through the state, thousands of Floridians were still in the dark as estimates of damage in nearly all parts of the peninsula continued to escalate.

  • Counting down the days

    By JIM SAUNDERS
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, Oct. 6 – Hurricane Irma tore through Florida almost a month ago.
    But the state continues to count its losses and look for ways to better prepare for hurricanes – all while hoping the latest storm doesn’t make a right-hand turn in the Gulf of Mexico.
    Nov. 30 can’t come soon enough.

  • Legislative delegation meets tonight

    Special to The News

    Rep. Halsey Beshears and Sen. Bill Montford will be in Wakulla County on Thursday, Sept. 28 at 5:30 p.m. for the annual Legislative Delegation Meeting. The hearing will be held in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers.
    All residents and elected officials are invited to attend. The purpose of the hearing is to allow the citizens of Wakulla County the opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments prior to the upcoming 2018 Legislative Session, which is scheduled to convene on Jan. 9.

  • `Unfathomable’

    By DARA KAM
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 15 –  Days after Hurricane Irma slashed a destructive swath through Florida, it’s still unclear exactly how much damage the state and its inhabitants have suffered. And it might be weeks – or even months – before the massive storm’s impact is known.
    From the Keys to Naples to Jacksonville, Irma wreaked havoc on homes and businesses, turned off lights and air conditioning for more than half the state and caused severe damage in the agriculture industry.

  • Local Government News: September 21st

    • WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL meets on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8:30 am. at the Magnuson Hotel Wildwood Inn, 3896 Coastal Hwy. in Crawfordville. (Rescheduled from Sept. 14)

    • RESTORE ACT MULTI-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN PUBLIC MEETING on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 6 p.m. at the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department, 1448 Shell Point Road, Crawfordville.

    • RESTORE ACT MULTI-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN PUBLIC MEETING on Monday, Sept. 25 at 6 p.m. at St. Marks City Hall, 788 Port Leon Drive in St. Marks.

  • District joins suit against state

    The Wakulla County School Board voted Monday night to join school districts across Florida in a legal challenge to House Bill 7069, a controversial education-conforming law that critics say will undermine local control and expand the charter school system.
    Thirteen other school districts are suing over the law.

  • `We will get through this together’

    By DARA KAM
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 8 – The week started off with the state – and the nation – mesmerized by Hurricane Harvey. But by Friday, Hurricane Irma sent Florida into a frenzy.
    As the colossal storm barreled toward the Sunshine State after wreaking havoc in the Caribbean, officials in South Florida ordered massive evacuations.
    Gov. Rick Scott shut down schools throughout the state and pleaded for volunteers.

  • RESTORE Act meetings set

    By NANCY IMPERIALE
    Staff Writer

    Seven years after the largest oil spill on U.S. shores threatened coastal areas including those in Wakulla, more than $89 million in settlement money from BP Oil will finally be making its way to Wakulla County.
    But the money has many strings attached, including a government support apparatus that is proving hard for even the most sophisticated government-watchers to fully understand.

  • Scott, Democrats claim victories

    By DARA KAM
    THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

    TALLAHASSEE, Sept. 1 – The historic flooding in Texas this week mesmerized people throughout the nation, including Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who dispatched hundreds of search and rescue personnel to the storm-ravaged region.
    While the impacts of Hurricane Harvey rightfully garnered most of the attention, the Sunshine State was awash in news.