.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Outdoors

  • Take extra care as manatees migrate

    Take extra care on Florida waterways as manatees begin to migrate after a rough winter.

    The FWC urges boaters to follow the posted speed zones and watch for manatees as temperatures warm. Manatees are once again moving from warm water sites to coastal areas where they forage for food, rest and care for their young.

    The number of documented manatee deaths resulting from watercraft strikes was higher than average statewide from December to March 27.

  • Coast Guard Auxiliary Reports 04.09

    For Flotilla 13 at Shell Point, the weather Saturday was beautiful, clear and sunny until late afternoon. For our Flotilla the first weekend in April is the beginning of the “boating season.”

    The Patrol Coxswain aboard Auxiliary Vessel AMMA was John Edrington. His crew was son Glenn Edrington, son-in-law James Taylor, Jim McGill and Bob Morgan. Usually the flotilla commander and vice commander are on duty for the first patrol. This year Commander Mae Waters was out of state, but Vice Commander John Sykes was here and was on radio duty.

  • Fishing tournament planned for children

    The annual Children’s Fishing Tournament will be held Saturday, April 25 with the weigh in and festivities held in Panacea’s Woolley Park. The event will start at 7 a.m. at the Port Panacea Marina. The last tournament fleet boat will leave the dock at 8:30 a.m. so don’t be late and don’t miss the boat! Children not going out on a family boat or with one of the fleet of volunteer captains may fish from any safe location and bring their catch to Woolley Park. Weigh-in will begin at 10 a.m. and conclude at 1 p.m., no exceptions. Children must be in line before 1 p.m.

  • Marine Lab hosts talk

    On Thursday, April 9, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., The Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory (FSUCML), located in St. Teresa, will present “Consumers Rule: The Primacy of Top-Down Effects in Shallow Benthic Ecosystems” -- the next lecture in the lab’s ongoing series of free public lectures on coastal and marine conservation. The lecture will be presented by Ken L. Heck, a professor of Marine Science at the University of South Alabama, senior marine scientist at Dauphin Island Sea Lab, and 1976 graduate of Florida State.

  • Food storage restrictions considered in National Forest

    The National Forests in Florida invites comments on proposed food storage restrictions for the Apalachicola, Ocala, and Osceola National Forests. They are taking the necessary and prudent steps toward public safety and from habituating wildlife by being unintentionally fed.

    Not only have human and bear populations increased resulting in more encounters with bears, other wildlife lose their natural fear of people, become reliant on human foods, and can become more aggressive.

  • FWC urges boaters to watch for manatees

    The FWC urges boaters to follow the posted speed zones and watch for manatees as temperatures warm. Manatees are once again moving from warm water sites to coastal areas where they forage for food, rest and care for their young.

    The number of documented manatee deaths resulting from watercraft strikes was higher than average statewide from December to March 27. It was particularly high in the southeastern region of Florida where necropsy results show that at least 17 manatees died from boat strikes.

  • Be careful of alligators this time of year

    Spring is when Florida’s alligators start getting active, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is urging Floridians and visitors to be cautious when having fun in and around water.

    Alligators abound in all 67 counties and have shared marshes, swamps, rivers and lakes with people for centuries. But, because more individuals are seeking waterfront property and water-related activities increase during the warm months, people should be alert when they are in areas where alligators could be present.

  • FWC offers hunter safety course in Leon

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County.

    The course will be in the second-floor conference room of the Farris Bryant Building, 620 South Meridian St., Tallahassee. Instruction will take place from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. April 14, April 16, April 21 and April 23. The range portion of the class will be on April 25.

    Children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes.

  • Despite rain, wildfires remain a concern in State of Florida

    Despite rainfall throughout the state, Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson is urging residents not to let their guard down.

    “Rainfall varied widely throughout the state, leaving areas in the Panhandle flooded while the central and southern peninsula still have high wildfire risk,” Bronson said. “More than 13 inches of rain fell in the far western Panhandle counties, while central and south Florida received little rain.”

  • Hummingbirds are a big part of our community

    I was somewhat relieved since I wouldn’t have to leave my home at 5:30 a.m. in order to meet the ”gang” in Aplalachicola at dawn as originally planned. We had wanted to get an early start with our boat trip from Apalachicola over to nearby St. Vincint Island (now a satellite refuge of our St. Marks National Refuge).